The Moon is Down - Cultural References

Setting | Character Summaries| Plot Synopsis | Critical Reception
Cultural References | Key Terms and Concepts


Heinrich Heine: A German Jewish poet from the 19th century. Lieutenant Tonder recites a stanza from Heine’s “Mit deinen blauen augen.”

Dynamite Sticks: After reading The Moon Is Down, Prime Minister Winston Churchill supported the idea of supplying small weapons to occupied countries. In what was called Operation Braddock II, England eventually dropped incendiary packets over Germany, with the intention of spreading confusing and sabotage in Germany, but the operation was never wholeheartedly embraced by the Minister of Economic Warfare and was soon abandoned.

Gas Lanterns: Before electricity, buildings were lighted with gas burning lamps. The lamps in the palace are mostly fueled by gas derived from coal.

Other War: The other war that Colonel Lanser refers to is modeled on World War I.

Destroyer: Warships fitted with weapons, including anti-aircraft guns.

Alderman: Usually a high-ranking elected town official.

Coal Barge: A flat-bottomed boat, sometimes pulled by another boat, used to transport coal.

Apology: Plato’s account of Socrates’ defense of the charges that led to his execution.

The Leader: A Hitler figure who is the leader and author of the invaders’ New World Order.


Setting | Character Summaries| Plot Synopsis | Critical Reception
Cultural References | Key Terms and Concepts